Our Blog

Wednesday, March 7, 2018 - 12:50
Originally published by Waste Management ReviewSmart Machinery Boosts Profitability  Moving recyclable material more than 800km from NSW to Queensland requires maximum payload to optimise fuel costs, which is why North Wyong Recycling recognised the benefit of investing in new technology.In 2015, the medium-sized business, which specialises in construction and demolition (C&D) waste, spent four months carrying about 16 to 17 tonnes of waste from the town of Wyong, in the Central Coast region, to Veolia’s recycling facility in Archerfield, Brisbane. Two vehicles of about 140... + continue reading
Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 16:15
Life of Forest Rd Landfill extended thanks to a new compactor Article supplied by Tamworrh Regional CouncilTamworth Regional Councill will be able to extend the life of its Forest Road landfill site by up to 50% through the purchase of a new garbage compactor. The Tana E520. a specialised purpose-built garbage compaction machine designed and built in Finland was delivered to the Tamworth Waste Management Facility on Forest Road at the end of last month.The new 'super heavy duty' vehicle weighs 52 tonnes - about double that of the compactor previously used - it is purpose-built for... + continue reading
Tana Shark Shredder
Friday, June 9, 2017 - 10:52
Tyre recycling is on a growth trajectory.Originally published in Waste Management ReviewA SUCCESSFUL PARTNERSHIP HAS ALLOWED AUSTRALIA'S LARGEST TYRE RECYCLER TO DOUBLE ITS RECYCLING OPERATION, THE COMPANY SAYS.Australia's largest and oldest recycler of tyres continues to expand its operations across Australia off the back of strong support from retailers, Tyrecycle says. The company, which began in 1992 has doubled its recycling operation since partnering with Tasmanian horticulture firm Barwicks seven months ago. Jim Fairweather, Tyrecycle CEO, says since the partnership launched last year... + continue reading
Wednesday, June 7, 2017 - 10:43
Originally published in Inside Waste MagazineFAMILY-OWNED manufacturer of growing and mulching mediums, soil amendments, and biological growth stimulants, Bio Gro has turned to GCM for its windrow turning needs.The company recently purchased a Backhus A50 windrow turner from GCM and Bio Gro managing director Stephen Van Schaik told Inside Waste he was impressed with GCM's service. "When we did the initial due diligence on the project, we compared the practice with a number of other players within the market and Daniel [Katsowksky, GCM managing director] went through quite a bit of detail. He... + continue reading
Wednesday, March 16, 2016 - 05:58
Originally published in Waste Management Review.WHEN WYONG SHIRE COUNCIL WAS FACED WITH A GLUT OF MATTRESSES AT ITS WASTE FACILITY, IT TURNED TO GCM ENVIRO FOR AN INNOVATIVE RECYCLING EQUIPMENT SUPPLY SOLUTION.Mattresses are regarded as a significant problem waste stream around the world. When stockpiled, they are a fire risk. As bulky items, each one can use around 0.75 cubic metres of landfill space. Their integral springs can damage or impact the lifespan of landfill equipment, and they float to the top of landfill cells. In Australia alone, as most people change their mattress every eight... + continue reading
Wednesday, July 1, 2015 - 00:00
Our customers often ask us how to turn shredded tyres into business. This series of articles enlightens the future possibilities of utilizing end-of-life tyres (ELTs) and also presents productive and environmental friendly applications that are already commercialized. -  Picture: 50x50mm tyre shreds work best as lightweight material. Tyre derived aggregates (TDA) have been used as lightweight in constructing roads, embankments, noise barriers, building foundations and bridge and road banks on soft grounds for decades. Technology is well-tested but true commercial brakethrough is... + continue reading
Monday, April 20, 2015 - 00:00
Our customers often ask us how to turn shredded tyres into business. This series of articles enlightens the future possibilities of utilizing end-of-life tyres (ELTs) and also presents productive and environmental friendly applications that are already commercialized.   Numerous studies have proven the filtering characteristics of shreds and granulates made from end-of-life tyres (ELTs) to be excellent in municipal waste water treatment in removing solids, organic matter, nitrogen and phosphorus. As this is both effective and safe for health and environment, there are already... + continue reading
Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 00:00
There are many innovative ways to give a new life to the end-of-life tyres - in a way which is profitable both to the waste handler and the environment. This introductive article gives a big picture about this relatively new business area. Recycling used tyres is a global challenge. In the United States alone, an average of 250 million tyres are discarded as waste annually. The figure is the same for Europe, and in Australia it is 48.5 million. Traditionally, used tyres have either been disposed of in landfills or incinerated for energy. However, the material extracted from used tyres could... + continue reading
Tuesday, December 31, 2013 - 00:00
Buying a waste shredder can be quite a challenging rehearsal. There are plenty of technologies and manufacturers and all claim to provide the best solution. The needs of today can change quickly and nobody wants to end up finding out having invested a lot of money in a machine that is not fit for purpose. We'd like to bring up some aspects worth considering when buying a shredder. I need to buy shredder… but what kind? Today’s market is overwhelmed by different kinds of shredders, grinders, fast-speed, slow-speed, chippers, pre-shredders, primary shredders, tub... + continue reading
Friday, August 17, 2012 - 00:00
Copper has been recycled ever since ancient times. It is said that the Colossus of Rhodes was made of copper, but unfortunately it was recycled and used to make other copper objects. However, it was easier for the ancient recyclers to re-use copper– you could just melt it.   These days, recycling copper is much more complicated, as the precious metal is often encased in plastics or other synthetics. Submarine power cable, which is an interesting source of recycled copper, may have a diameter of 150 mm, of which 100 mm is copper. The rest is hard and durable plastics. In order to... + continue reading